Monday, September 22, 2014

Mariner 10 at 40

Forty years ago, Mariner 10 flew by Mercury for the second time.  I don't have anything new to post from that flyby now, but here is a more recent crack at an image from Mariner 10's first flyby, taken several days after closest approach and showing more of the Caloris Basin and the crater Mozart than could be seen during closest approach. 


Data Courtesy NASA/JPL, Processed Image Copyright Ted Stryk

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Triton again


Here is an area of Triton on the hemisphere seen close up but not very well imaged.  Two intersecting tectonic features can be seen. Triton is the largest known KBO (albeit a captured one) and while it is better known than any others (at least until next year), it begs for further exploration. 



Processed image Copyright Ted Stryk, Raw Data Courtesy NASA/JPL

Monday, August 25, 2014

Latest reworking of the best Triton mosaic...

I am still working with this dataset.  I have an idea for some "grand" mosaics combining more image data and hopefully doing better with the terminator.  I have, however, fixed the unnatural limb, and some hazes are visible.   I am posting this today in honor of the 25th anniversary of Voyager 2's flyby of Neptune and Triton.


Here is an enlargement showing some of the atmospheric features visible.


Processed image Copyright Ted Stryk, Raw Data Courtesy NASA/JPL

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

A full Titania

As Voyager 2 approached the Uranian system in 1986, it focused primarily on Titania, the largest moon, until closest approach.  One of the most interesting of the more distant approach shots is this one, Titania at "full" phase.  It shows largely uniform moon with the exception of the effects of impact craters. 


Processed image Copyright Ted Stryk, Raw Data Courtesy NASA/JPL

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Another crescent view of Triton

Two years ago, I posted these views of Triton.  They represent two of the best global color views.  The bottom one is one of the first image sets taken (but with the wide angle camera), and shows an extremely slender crescent.  The upper image shows the first (and best) global color set taken with the narrow angle camera.  The image I am posting here was taken about three hours later.  This was the last view of Triton taken on encounter day and shows it from a slightly different angle...essentially Triton's last closeup from Voyager. 


Processed image Copyright Ted Stryk, Raw Data Courtesy NASA/JPL

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

A Voyager 2 View of Europa

As Voyager 2 approached Europa, this was the highest resolution global view it obtained before Europa filled more than the entire frame.  Europa was still quite small in the field of view at this point (the time in between this and the global mosaics it would later take was spent studying other targets), and, given the intricate, low contrast nature of its surface, this made this dataset very hard to work with.  It was taken on July 8, 1979, from a range of about 1.2 million kilometers. 


Raw data courtesy NASA/JPL, Processed images Copyright Ted Stryk